El World Press Photo anunció a sus nominados para la foto del año en la edición 63 del prestigioso premio de fotoperiodismo. Problemas sociales en África y estragos de la guerra han vuelto a ser el tema central de las imágenes que lograron colarse entre las finalistas.

El concurso de fotoperiodismo más importante del mundo otorgará un premio económico de 10 mil euros (200 mil pesos mexicanos) al ganador de la foto del año. En total, son ocho categorías que reconocen a las mejores fotos individuales y mejor serie de imágenes.

En total, el World Press Photo recibió más de 73 mil fotografías de 4 mil 282 participantes de 125 nacionalidades diferentes. De esa cifra, 44 resultaron nominados y solo seis fotógrafos competirán por el prestigioso reconocimiento.

Mulugueta Ayene, Yasuyoshi Chiba, Tomek Kaczor, Ivor Prickett, Nikita Teryoshin y Farouk Batiche fueron los elegidos por el jurado para competir por la foto del año. Será el próximo 16 de abril cuando el World Press Photo publique el nombre del fotógrafo ganador.

Nominados a foto del año en World Press Photo 2020:

Mulugueta Ayene (Etiopía)

“Un pariente de una víctima del accidente del vuelo ET302 de Ethiopian Airlines le arroja tierra en la cara mientras llora en el lugar del accidente del vuelo ET302 de Ethiopian Airlines, en las afueras de Addis Abeba, Etiopía, el 14 de marzo de 2019”

 

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

 

A relative of a victim of the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 throws dirt in her face as she grieves at the crash site of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302, outside Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 14 March 2019. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘Relative Mourns Flight ET 302 Crash Victim’ by Mulugeta Ayene (@mulugetaayene), Ethiopia, Associated Press (@apnews). One of six World Press Photo of the Year nominees. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On 10 March, Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302, a Boeing 737 MAX, disappeared from the radar six minutes after take-off from Addis Ababa airport and crashed into a field, killing all 157 people on board. The impact was so great that both engines were buried in a crater 10 meters deep, and any human remains were almost impossible to identify. On 14 November, eight months after the crash, the site of the impact was covered and the unidentified remains of victims buried in rows of identical coffins. Comparisons were made with the crash of a Lion Air aircraft, also a 737 MAX, 12 minutes after take-off from Jakarta in October 2018. Countries across the world, initially with the exception of the US, grounded the 737 MAX. First reports showed that pilots had been unable to prevent the plane repeatedly nosediving, despite following procedures recommended by Boeing. It appeared that in both cases pilots were struggling to deal with an automated safety system designed to prevent stalling, which was repeatedly pushing the nose of the plane down. It seemed that the system was being activated, possibly due to a faulty sensor, even though nothing was wrong. It later emerged that American Airlines pilots had confronted Boeing about potential safety issues with the MAX. Boeing had resisted their calls but promised a software fix, which had not been done by the time Flight ET302 crashed. Planes remained grounded into 2020. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ – ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The 2020 Photo Contest & 2020 Digital Storytelling Contest nominees have been announced! We’re sharing the nominated photos in alphabetical order. Discover the stories that matter, chosen by an independent jury by following the link in our bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The winners will be announced on 16 April. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2020 #worldpressphoto

Una publicación compartida de World Press Photo Foundation (@worldpressphoto) el

Farouk Batiche (Argelia)

“Los estudiantes se pelean con la policía antidisturbios durante una manifestación antigubernamental en Argel, Argelia, el 21 de mayo de 2019”

 

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

 

Students scuffle with riot police during an anti-government demonstration in Algiers, Algeria, on 21 May 2019. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘Clash with the Police During an Anti-Government Demonstration’ by Farouk Batiche, Algeria, Deutsche Presse-Agentur (@dpa_com). One of six World Press Photo of the Year nominees. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Algeria had been embroiled in protests since February 2019. Initially, protests had been aimed at ousting long-time president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, an 81-year-old veteran of Algeria’s independence struggle who had been in ill-health and not seen in public for some time. Bouteflika resigned in April, handing over to a military-backed caretaker government, but demonstrations continued. Protesters demanded the cancellation of the presidential elections set to take place on 4 July and a return to civilian democracy. They also called for the departure of government officials associated with the Bouteflika administration, including the interim president and prime minister. Protests continued into 2020 without successful resolution. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ – ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The 2020 Photo Contest & 2020 Digital Storytelling Contest nominees have been announced! We’re sharing the nominated photos, selected from 73,996 images by 4,283 photographers from 125 countries, in alphabetical order. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Discover the stories that matter, chosen by an independent jury of photography and digital storytelling professionals by following the link in our bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The winners will be announced at the Awards Show in Amsterdam on 16 April. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2020 #worldpressphoto

Una publicación compartida de World Press Photo Foundation (@worldpressphoto) el

Yasuyoshi Chiba (Japón)

“Un joven, iluminado por teléfonos móviles, recita un poema mientras los manifestantes cantan consignas pidiendo un gobierno civil, durante un apagón en Jartum, Sudán, el 19 de junio de 2019”

 

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

 

A young man, illuminated by mobile phones, recites a poem while protestors chant slogans calling for civilian rule, during a blackout in Khartoum, Sudan, on 19 June 2019. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘Straight Voice’ by Yasuyoshi Chiba (@yasuyoshi_chiba), Japan, Agence France-Presse (@afpphoto). One of six World Press Photo of the Year nominees. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Protests had begun in the eastern city of Atbara in December 2018, reportedly against the tripling of the price of bread, but then broadened in focus and had spread rapidly throughout the country. By April 2019, protesters were staging a sit-in close to army headquarters in the capital Khartoum, and demanding an end to the 30-year rule of dictator Omar al-Bashir. On 11 April, al-Bashir was removed from office in a military coup, and a transitional military government was established. Protests continued, calling for power to be handed to civilian groups. On 3 June, government forces opened fire on unarmed protesters. Scores of people were killed and many more subject to further violence. Three days later the African Union suspended Sudan, in the midst of widespread international condemnation of the attack. The authorities sought to defuse protests by imposing blackouts, and shutting down the internet. Protesters communicated by text message, word of mouth and using megaphones, and resistance to military rule continued. Despite another severe crackdown on 30 June, the pro-democracy movement was eventually successful in signing a power-sharing agreement with the military, on 17 August. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ – ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The 2020 Photo Contest & 2020 Digital Storytelling Contest nominees have been announced! We’re sharing the nominated photos, selected from 73,996 images by 4,283 photographers from 125 countries, in alphabetical order. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Discover the stories that matter, chosen by an independent jury of photography and digital storytelling professionals by following the link in our bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The winners will be announced at the Awards Show in Amsterdam on 16 April. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2020 #worldpressphoto

Una publicación compartida de World Press Photo Foundation (@worldpressphoto) el

Tomek Kaczor (Polonia)

“Ewa, una niña armenia de 15 años que recientemente se despertó del estado catatónico provocado por el Síndrome de Resignación, se sienta en una silla de ruedas, flanqueada por sus padres, en un centro de recepción de refugiados en Podkowa Leśna, Polonia”

 

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

 

Ewa, a 15-year-old Armenian girl who has recently woken from catatonic state brought on by Resignation Syndrome, sits in a wheelchair, flanked by her parents, in a refugee reception center in Podkowa Leśna, Poland. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘Awakening’ by Tomek Kaczor (@tomek_kaczor), Poland, for Duży Format (@duzyformat), Gazeta Wyborcza (@gazeta_wyborcza). One of six World Press Photo of the Year nominees. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Resignation Syndrome (RS) renders patients passive, immobile, mute, unable to eat and drink, incontinent and unresponsive to physical stimulus. It affects psychologically traumatised children in the midst of lengthy asylum processes, and seems most common in Roma and Yazidi children as well as those from the Balkans. It was first noted in the late 1990s, and was thought to be confined to Sweden, though cases have since been reported in the offshore refugee detention center run by the Australian government in Nauru. Remission and gradual return to normal function occurs after life circumstances improve. The Armenian girl succumbed to RS while her family were trying for asylum in Sweden, but recovered eight months later after they had been deported to Poland. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ – ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The 2020 Photo Contest & 2020 Digital Storytelling Contest nominees have been announced! We’re sharing the nominated photos, selected from 73,996 images by 4,283 photographers from 125 countries, in alphabetical order. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Discover the stories that matter, chosen by an independent jury of photography and digital storytelling professionals by following the link in our bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The winners will be announced at the Awards Show in Amsterdam on 16 April. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2020 #worldpressphoto

Una publicación compartida de World Press Photo Foundation (@worldpressphoto) el

Ivor Prickett (Irlanda)

“No sé qué decir en este momento, excepto gracias a Ahmed Ibrahim y su compañero por dejarme tomar esta foto en un momento tan vulnerable. Fue sin duda una de las escenas más desgarradoras que he presenciado”

 

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

 

World Press Photo 2020 just announced the nominees for this years cycle. I am once again humbled and honoured to be in the mix along side some incredible colleagues. My series ‘ISIS and it’s Aftermath in Syria’ is nominated in the General News stories category and the first photo here is also nominated for the Photo of the Year. I don’t quite know what to say at this point except thank you to Ahmed Ibrahim and his partner for letting me take this picture at such a vulnerable moment. It was without a doubt one of the most heart piercing scenes I have ever witnessed. What happened in north east Syria in 2019 was hard to sum up in 10 pictures. I’m glad people seemed to understand what I was trying to say. Thank you to the judges for giving this work and story another life and for helping to remind people of the dire consequences of war. You can see the full edit and all the other amazing nominees on the @worldpressphoto website through the link in my bio. Thank you as always to the @nytimes for giving me the opportunity to do the work I feel is important. @canonuk

Una publicación compartida de Ivor Prickett (@ivorprickett) el

Nikita Teryoshin (Rusia)

“Un hombre de negocios encierra un par de lanzagranadas antitanque al final de un día de exhibición, en la Exposición y Conferencia Internacional de Defensa (IDEX) en Abu Dhabi, Emiratos Árabes Unidos, el 18 de febrero”

 

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

 

Excited to be nominated for the World Press Photo of the year and Contemporary Issues singles with one of my pictures from the “nothing personal – tha back office of war” series taken in February in Abu Dhabi!! @worldpressphoto „18 February, 2019 A businessman locks away a pair of anti-tank grenade launchers at the end of an exhibition day, at the International Defence Exhibition and Conference (IDEX) in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on 18 February. IDEX is the biggest defense exhibition and conference in the Middle East, and one of the biggest arms trade-fairs in the world. No official attendance figures are released, but according to UAE state media the event drew 1,200 global defence specialists, 1,300 exhibitors and more than 105,000 visitors. Attendees include defense ministers, military chiefs of staff and key government decision-makers, who interact in conference halls, social events and back-office meetings. War is staged in an artificial environment where mannequins and screen images take the place of real people, and with outdoor demonstrations and daily choreographed battle displays on water. ” https://www.worldpressphoto.org/collection/photocontest/winners/2020

Una publicación compartida de Nikita Teryoshin (@teryoshi) el

Vía SDP Noticias.